Margaret River and Dunsborough Burrowing Crayfish

Posted on Dec 23, 2014


The Margaret River Burrowing Crayfish (Engaewa pseudoreducta) is a small burrowing crayfish up to 50mm in length which is a pale to mid brown colour with purple-blue claws, and is almost identical to the closely related Walpole Burrowing Crayfish and Dunsborough Burrowing Crayfish. However these species can generally be distinguished by which river system they are found in, as they are geographically isolated from each other with limited capacity for dispersal.

Conservation Status

The Margaret River Burrowing Crayfish is listed as critically endangered as it only occurs as two extant subpopulations (which are isolated from each other) in the headwaters of a small tributary of the Margaret River in State Forest, occupying an area of less than 1 km2. This area where they are found has no formal protection, so with their limited capacity for dispersal this species could easily become extinct should they be threatened.

Threats

The main threats to this crayfish include land clearing, farm dam construction, and cattle grazing.

SWCC Strategic Priority

The Margaret River Burrowing Crayfish is identified as a first order priority asset within SWCC’s NRM Strategy under the Aquatic Biodiversity theme. The Dunsborough and Walpole Burrowing Crayfish are identified as second order priority assets within SWCC’s NRM Strategy under the Aquatic Biodiversity theme.

Projects

Key projects: No current projects for this species

References

  • Approved Conservation advice for Engaewa pseudoreducta (Margaret River Burrowing Crayfish)

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